Category Archives: Publicity jobs

Sara Tindley – Wild and Unknown

Sara Tindley presents Wild and Unknown

Publicity bio for album release of 2017

Sara Tindley returns to Australian stages this year with a fearless new album, Wild and Unknown.

Performed as a duo with Michael Turner (Wild Pumpkins at Midnight, The Drift, Durga Babies, Spike), the album was produced by Nick Didia (Bruce Springsteen, Powderfinger, Pearl Jam) at La Cueva, his beautiful Tyagarah studio.

Michael Turner is a songwriting and performing veteran who’s toured much of the world and could be said to know a few things about mortality. His distinctive, sitar-like drones and arrangements underpin a luminous production that hums with light and space.

Their collaboration germinated twelve wry, insightful tracks narrating the turbulent life Tindley’s endured since her last album, Time (2011). Produced by country music luminary Bill Chambers (who also produced Lucky the Sun in 2006), Time radiated the quiet beauty engendered through Sara’s friendship and musical partnership with Adelaide folksters The Yearlings.

That endeavor followed on from 5 Days, (2003), which catalyzed a huge ABC radio following and saw songs placed on the TV series East of Everything and Bondi Rescue. They add to Tindley’s extant soundtracks; ABC radio having included the autobiographical song Down the Avenue on its compilation album Best of Airplay and used it in a promotional video, starring Sara singing on the back of a ute.

Sara’s resurgence is a welcome return to crowds used to her warm rootsy performances at the East Coast Blues and Roots Festival, Mullum Music Festival, Gympie Muster, Splendour in the Grass and Tamworth CMF, among many others.

Wild and Unknown is a beautifully crafted album that stands tall in Tindley’s exceptional canon of fine musical works.

Like the title track, it’s bursting with wonder and joy; “I feel like I’ve landed on the moon”. It tackles Tindley’s resurgence with wry playfulness, faith in family and the transcendent qualities of music.

Twelve songs run the gamut of emotion, from the title track’s declaration of intent, “I’m gonna bring it all the way back home”, to the gentle, ukulele lullaby of Iluka; “this army walks beside me, no more damage can be done”.

While All your love is Gone jinks and twists through romantic chicanes, the gorgeous ballad Cities comes off like a lost Joni Mitchell masterpiece. Tindley’s voice has never been richer, more deeply steeped in emotion. Her songs have always narrated a compelling life; as she charts a course into the Wild and Unknown she’s certain to take us with her.

Adam Young – Elementary Carnival Blues

After over a decade in the wilderness, Adam Young returns to the public eye with an alarmingly good album.

Last seen in the 90s with grunge guitar bands the Daisygrinders and Big Heavy Stuff, here Young cut his teeth on distorted guitars and the soft/loud riffing excursions de jour. After the timely collapse of Nirvana, Silverchair and Enya put paid to that era, he was resigned to a decade and a half of mainstream employment, desultory gigging and the slow accumulation of new material.
But as a Canadian by birth he was unable to keep the demons of country music out of his head and in exile, Young embraced them. The songs that started to take root were steeped in alt-country impressionism as much as REM’s outlandish architecture and the fuzzy guitars that survived the demise of smacked out flanno coutre. Bush tours with hick, shouty singers such as Den Hanrahan furnished stories and hardened his resolve.
Sensing something spectral looming, Young engaged a team of crack musicians and producers to harness the poltergeists. The result is a hard-wired simulacrum of contemporary country rock. The cinematic pedal steel and electric guitars of Jason Walker provide the panoramas that bassist/producer Mike Rix saw as the only things big enough to house Young’s vision. With Jeff Mercer also contributing guitars and the likes of Corrina Steel and Emma Swift harmonizing on Young’s paeans, Rix had a broad palette to work with.
Thus we have a fine collection of songs whose velveteen textures only wanted the gloss finish of Kate Brianna’s charming pipes. Her duets with Young are a regular feature of live sets and burnish his pocket ouvre with authentic mid-West chic.
They thrive on gaunt, enigmatic lyrics. ‘Ghost Songs’ is a standout. Bouyed by a simple, irresistible melody, it dances over jaunty countrified licks, anchored to an aching refrain; “leave a light on for an old friend”. ‘Queen of the Plains’ and Breeza occupy the same haunted stratosphere, sparse haikus leaving plenty of room for a majestic vision to unfold between your ears. ‘Wolfe Island Blues’ echoes in the room long after the albums over.
Though they easily ride the current insatiable thirst for Americana, these songs would have found a home in late 80s alternative rock charts or as no-wave dirge anthems. They stand up to the dazzling production and work hard on Young’s increasingly frequent solo outings. Indeed his solo shows demonstrate why these songs, lithe and muscular, stand out in a hi-sheen recording. Quite simply, they’re terrific ballads. Springsteen himself would stand up on somebody’s coffee table and bellow something incomprehensible about ‘em.
Youngy is back from the wilderness and he’s had a shower.

On Stanley Records

Review of Adam Young’s 2016 album, Elementary Carnival Blues, on Stanley records

After over a decade in the wilderness, Adam Young returns to the public eye with an alarmingly good album.

Last seen in the 90s with grunge guitar bands the Daisygrinders and Big Heavy Stuff, here Young cut his teeth on distorted guitars and the soft/loud riffing excursions de jour. After the timely collapse of Nirvana, Silverchair and Enya put paid to that era, he was resigned to a decade and a half of mainstream employment, desultory gigging and the slow accumulation of new material.

But as a Canadian by birth he was unable to keep the demons of country music out of his head and in exile, Young embraced them. The songs that started to take root were steeped in alt-country impressionism as much as REM’s outlandish architecture and the fuzzy guitars that survived the demise of smacked out flanno coutre. Bush tours with hick, shouty singers such as Den Hanrahan furnished stories and hardened his resolve.

Sensing something spectral looming, Young engaged a team of crack musicians and producers to harness the poltergeists. The result is a hard-wired simulacrum of contemporary country rock. The cinematic pedal steel and electric guitars of Jason Walker provide the panoramas that bassist/producer Mike Rix saw as the only things big enough to house Young’s vision. With Jeff Mercer also contributing guitars and the likes of Corrina Steel and Emma Swift harmonizing on Young’s paeans, Rix had a broad palette to work with.

Thus we have a fine collection of songs whose velveteen textures only wanted the gloss finish of Kate Brianna’s charming pipes. Her duets with Young are a regular feature of live sets and burnish his pocket ouvre with authentic mid-West chic.

They thrive on gaunt, enigmatic lyrics. ‘Ghost Songs’ is a standout. Bouyed by a simple, irresistible melody, it dances over jaunty countrified licks, anchored to an aching refrain; “leave a light on for an old friend”. ‘Queen of the Plains’ and Breeza occupy the same haunted stratosphere, sparse haikus leaving plenty of room for a majestic vision to unfold between your ears. ‘Wolfe Island Blues’ echoes in the room long after the albums over.

Though they easily ride the current insatiable thirst for Americana, these songs would have found a home in late 80s alternative rock charts or as no-wave dirge anthems. They stand up to the dazzling production and work hard on Young’s increasingly frequent solo outings. Indeed his solo shows demonstrate why these songs, lithe and muscular, stand out in a hi-sheen recording. Quite simply, they’re terrific ballads. Springsteen himself would stand up on somebody’s coffee table and bellow something incomprehensible about ‘em.

Youngy is back from the wilderness and he’s had a shower.

 

 

 

James Cruickshank – press release for ‘Note to Self’

James Cruickshank, acclaimed guitarist and keyboardist for the Cruel Sea, releases his second solo album, Note To Self, through Mullumbimby’s Vitamin records.

Flashes of Sam Cooke, David Bowie, Tom Waits and Beefheart reveal in the swinging gait and crooked instrumental passages of a moody serenade through Cruikshank’s yellowed back pages. Tinkering with strings and keys, swamp jazz and electronic propulsion, these meditations on maturing in a Peter Pan era could have been recorded in a time capsule, but the production, resolutely 21st century, lands it safely in a contemporary quarter.

Continue reading James Cruickshank – press release for ‘Note to Self’

Tumbleweed Live Review for Reverb Magazine Feb 2011

Tumbleweed’s summer tour may have been blighted by Biblical plagues and a distinct dearth of Triple J’s paternal attentions, but there was more venom and fun and pure raunch in every riff-packed number than in any of the fifty hot new things the yoof network flings at us every month.

They rolled and swung and stung like some kind of punch-drunk lurching phenomenon. Ali in Zimbabwe, Keating in question time, the Stones in exile.

Continue reading Tumbleweed Live Review for Reverb Magazine Feb 2011